Special Exhibitions: Ray Albano, Art Fair Philippines

Ray Albano
The Link, Makati

Installation Views

About

    Ray Albano: Aleator

    “After blueprinting the photos and text, I throw them on a piece of paper and see whatever comes out. Sometimes I ask other people to put the blueprints randomly.”

    Ray Albano (1947-1985) calls this procedure, if it were one at all, aleatory. Indeed, Albano in more ways than one was an aleator, a gamester or dice player who was alert to chance as he was to design. The posters of Albano, a fragment of his vast corpus in a gamut of media, are best viewed as forming a relay of graphic efforts across intense oscillations between chance and design. As a relay, the moments do not fall into place in strict sequence and according to prophecy. It is hard in fact to glean which among the elements come first and how everything else besides comes together ultimately as posters. But note, too, the other key phrase in the memo: “other people.” Albano was not some self-styled high priest or self-important cult figure holding court; he was a worker in a field of many and in a situation in which the random and the throwing were both method and madness, with the agent and the event anticipating the “whatever” that “comes out.”

    Firstly, poster work for Albano was part of curatorial tasks at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, which he began around 1969. As a curator, he wanted to open up the Center, thought to be a bastion of the aesthete in the restive seventies, to an “ecumenical” public that could be initiated into what he conjured as a world “suddenly turning visible.” In this regard, the posters spoke to the range of events at the Center in which Albano was partly involved as a curator, graphic and set designer, writer, thinker, and personnel of the mainly Martial Law nation-state. The posters were meant to inform, and so text and image were basically data, which were then processed artistically as a mass-produced document to foster the institution’s commitment to the “seven arts” and to pursue a program he called “developmental art.” Moreover, the textual work in Albano’s practice extended to writing. He was an attentive annotator of art and the artistic impulse. He was a critic, theorist, poet, editor, and maker of performance text. The reprographic as manifested in all manner of material that circulated in multiples was central in this everyday grind.

    The second instance in the relay is a broadly conceived printmaking practice that included graphic design. Central in Albano’s consciousness was the relationship between image and typography, in other words between objects in space and their inscription onto a ground. At some point in the interface, the two internalize and calibrate each other. The modules of this design scheme made sense of a variety of initiations at the Center: retrospectives, annual surveys, concerts, and travelling exhibitions from Romania to Egypt. This diversity had to stray into the graphic field of the poster in which Albano would mingle floor plans, archival documents, art works, things, and portraits and subject them to darkroom treatments, staged tableaux, collage, advertising syntax, or just bare-boned journalism. He played with typography on proofs; took risks with monotones and half-tones; probed the prospects of over-inking, solarizing, and streaking. Asymmetries, juxtapositions, minimalisms, and horror vacui were constantly tried and toyed with.

    The third node deepens the ramification of the image as it enhances the capacity of the poster as a popular medium. This pertains to photography as a salient aspect in the conceptualization of the poster. The photographic image in the hands of Albano is a highly mediated image, one that is complicit in the project of representation and the aesthetic that attends such contentious issues as replication, authenticity, truth, illusion, and reality.

    Finally, the poster fulfils the promise of art that repeats and transforms across an array of interests as it intersects with the performative inclinations of Albano. This is sharply articulated in the work Step on the Sand and Make Footprints. It was submitted to the Tokyo International Biennial Exhibition of Prints in 1974 as a print and was conferred a prize as such, thus complicating the nature of the graphic aesthetic and at the same time returning it to its fundamental gesture of marking an index, which is the pressure of the human body transferred onto a surface. Such intuition to play with both unknown thought and the “unthought known” likewise reveals Albano to be a homo ludens who was generous in his exploration of the artistic process and open to the laughter that may unsettle its pose. Rather than becoming solipsistic and obsessing about the conceptualist privilege, he released the latter to a vaster atmosphere: as more people took part and engaged in their own experiments, so did artists sort out their own experiences reflexively within and beyond the art world. The said work, which was for all intents and purposes a sandbox or a sand room, was therefore, all at once, graphic, installative, and performative. Rubrics fall away and “childhood urges” are restored with this almost artless, and yet so generous, invitation to make a step and leave a trace, a path, a direction in the very act of nearly uneventful walking.

    Albano was an important cipher in that precarious phase or threshold of Philippine contemporary art in which the competing discourses of identity, tradition, and modernity sought to constitute what it meant to be contemporary and Filipino amid the push and pull of becoming local and international, of being western and native. Such an unnerving anxiety evoked a worldliness that refused to rest on the easy distinctions between the inside and the outside, the here and there, the center and the province. Albano, always with patience and wit, stayed with the trouble that comes with being current and resisted being rendered merely instrumental by either profligate institution or individual conceit: therefore, by turns commonplace and sui generis.

     

    Words by Dr. Patrick D. Flores

Ray Albano: Aleator

“After blueprinting the photos and text, I throw them on a piece of paper and see whatever comes out. Sometimes I ask other people to put the blueprints randomly.”

Ray Albano (1947-1985) calls this procedure, if it were one at all, aleatory. Indeed, Albano in more ways than one was an aleator, a gamester or dice player who was alert to chance as he was to design. The posters of Albano, a fragment of his vast corpus in a gamut of media, are best viewed as forming a relay of graphic efforts across intense oscillations between chance and design. As a relay, the moments do not fall into place in strict sequence and according to prophecy. It is hard in fact to glean which among the elements come first and how everything else besides comes together ultimately as posters. But note, too, the other key phrase in the memo: “other people.” Albano was not some self-styled high priest or self-important cult figure holding court; he was a worker in a field of many and in a situation in which the random and the throwing were both method and madness, with the agent and the event anticipating the “whatever” that “comes out.”

Firstly, poster work for Albano was part of curatorial tasks at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, which he began around 1969. As a curator, he wanted to open up the Center, thought to be a bastion of the aesthete in the restive seventies, to an “ecumenical” public that could be initiated into what he conjured as a world “suddenly turning visible.” In this regard, the posters spoke to the range of events at the Center in which Albano was partly involved as a curator, graphic and set designer, writer, thinker, and personnel of the mainly Martial Law nation-state. The posters were meant to inform, and so text and image were basically data, which were then processed artistically as a mass-produced document to foster the institution’s commitment to the “seven arts” and to pursue a program he called “developmental art.” Moreover, the textual work in Albano’s practice extended to writing. He was an attentive annotator of art and the artistic impulse. He was a critic, theorist, poet, editor, and maker of performance text. The reprographic as manifested in all manner of material that circulated in multiples was central in this everyday grind.

The second instance in the relay is a broadly conceived printmaking practice that included graphic design. Central in Albano’s consciousness was the relationship between image and typography, in other words between objects in space and their inscription onto a ground. At some point in the interface, the two internalize and calibrate each other. The modules of this design scheme made sense of a variety of initiations at the Center: retrospectives, annual surveys, concerts, and travelling exhibitions from Romania to Egypt. This diversity had to stray into the graphic field of the poster in which Albano would mingle floor plans, archival documents, art works, things, and portraits and subject them to darkroom treatments, staged tableaux, collage, advertising syntax, or just bare-boned journalism. He played with typography on proofs; took risks with monotones and half-tones; probed the prospects of over-inking, solarizing, and streaking. Asymmetries, juxtapositions, minimalisms, and horror vacui were constantly tried and toyed with.

The third node deepens the ramification of the image as it enhances the capacity of the poster as a popular medium. This pertains to photography as a salient aspect in the conceptualization of the poster. The photographic image in the hands of Albano is a highly mediated image, one that is complicit in the project of representation and the aesthetic that attends such contentious issues as replication, authenticity, truth, illusion, and reality.

Finally, the poster fulfils the promise of art that repeats and transforms across an array of interests as it intersects with the performative inclinations of Albano. This is sharply articulated in the work Step on the Sand and Make Footprints. It was submitted to the Tokyo International Biennial Exhibition of Prints in 1974 as a print and was conferred a prize as such, thus complicating the nature of the graphic aesthetic and at the same time returning it to its fundamental gesture of marking an index, which is the pressure of the human body transferred onto a surface. Such intuition to play with both unknown thought and the “unthought known” likewise reveals Albano to be a homo ludens who was generous in his exploration of the artistic process and open to the laughter that may unsettle its pose. Rather than becoming solipsistic and obsessing about the conceptualist privilege, he released the latter to a vaster atmosphere: as more people took part and engaged in their own experiments, so did artists sort out their own experiences reflexively within and beyond the art world. The said work, which was for all intents and purposes a sandbox or a sand room, was therefore, all at once, graphic, installative, and performative. Rubrics fall away and “childhood urges” are restored with this almost artless, and yet so generous, invitation to make a step and leave a trace, a path, a direction in the very act of nearly uneventful walking.

Albano was an important cipher in that precarious phase or threshold of Philippine contemporary art in which the competing discourses of identity, tradition, and modernity sought to constitute what it meant to be contemporary and Filipino amid the push and pull of becoming local and international, of being western and native. Such an unnerving anxiety evoked a worldliness that refused to rest on the easy distinctions between the inside and the outside, the here and there, the center and the province. Albano, always with patience and wit, stayed with the trouble that comes with being current and resisted being rendered merely instrumental by either profligate institution or individual conceit: therefore, by turns commonplace and sui generis.

 

Words by Dr. Patrick D. Flores

Works

Ray Albano
The 17th Annual Elizalde-NPC Photo-Journalism Exhibit of the Press Photographers of the Philippines, CCP Main Gallery
1976-02
5415
2
paper
24.02h x 17.91w in • 61h x 45.50w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
18th NPC-Elizalde Annual exhibition of the Press Photographers of the Philippines, CCP
1977-03
5416
2
paper
18h x 24w in • 45.72h x 60.96w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
25 Years Retrospective Prints and Drawings by Jovenal Sanso, CCP Main Gallery
1974-01
5417
2
paper
23.82h x 17.91w in • 60.50h x 45.50w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
‘81 Philippine Photography Festival, CCP Main and Small Gallery
1981-01
5418
2
paper
28h x 19.50w in • 71.12h x 49.53w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
9 Photographers: Litz Nievera-Benipayo, Marian Crisostomo, Noli Garalde, Nap Jamir II, Al Manrique, Neal Oshima, Mar Paras, Jose Antonio Perez, Judy Freya Sibayan, CCP Main Gallery
1978-06
5419
2
paper
28h x 20w in • 71.12h x 50.80w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
A Decade of Developmental Art, CCP Main Gallery
1979-10
5420
2
paper
28h x 20w in • 71.12h x 50.80w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
An Exhibition in Three Parts: Donato Alvarez, Pete Carino, Carissa Catambay, Rolando de Leon, Kinjo Estioko, Sonya Florentino, Regina O. Goquingco, Felix Hagad, Raul Henson, Eugene Jamerlan, Armand Sta. Ana, Rowell C. See, Gerry Tan, CCP Small Gallery
1980-03
5421
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Art in the CCP
1975-09
5422
2
paper
24.24h x 18w in • 61.57h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Art in the CCP: 1970 to 1975, CCP Main Gallery,
1975-09
5423
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Art Museum, An Exhibition by Judy Freya Sibayan, CCP Main Gallery
1975-07
5424
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
1
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Betsy Westendorp de Brias Paintings
1975-10
5425
2
paper
23h x 15w in • 58.42h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Brancusi, Works in Pictures by Constantin Brancusi
1976-08
5426
2
paper
17h x 23w in • 43.18h x 58.42w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Carousel Festival, Projects and collections of documentary slides by Jose Marte Abueg, Ray Albano, Mario Co, Nath Gutierrez, Nap Jamir II, Butch Perez, Rudy Sacdalan Sr., Ed Santiago, Judy Freya Sibayan, CCP End Room
1977-03
5427
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
CCP Annual for the Visual Arts 1979, CCP Main Gallery
1979-11
5428
2
paper
28h x 20w in • 71.12h x 50.80w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
An Exhibition of the Color Photographs of the CCP Dance Company by Jaime Zobel, CCP Museum Hallway
1980-03
5429
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Chinese paintings by Poo Duraiswamy, CCP Small Gallery
1974-09
5430
2
paper
15h x 21w in • 38.10h x 53.34w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Collage, CCP Small Gallery
1976-07
5431
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Collection, CCP Small Gallery
1971-01
5432
2
paper
19.50h x 12.75w in • 49.53h x 32.39w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Drawings, CCP Main Gallery
1972-07
5433
2
paper
23h x 17w in • 58.42h x 43.18w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Drawings by Chabet, CCP Small Gallery
1978092
5434
2
paper
28h x 18.60w in • 71.12h x 47.24w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
First CCP Annual of Recent Philippine Painting and Sculpture, CCP Main Gallery
1976-08
5435
2
paper
28h x 19.75w in • 71.12h x 50.17w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Edition 1 of 2
Details
Ray Albano
Five Printmakers, An Exhibition of Graphic Works by Avellana-Cosio, Escudero, Fajardo, Gelvezon, Querubin, CCP Small Gallery
1971-06
5436
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Goya: Engravings, Homage to the Bulls Series, CCP Small Gallery
1974-10
5437
2
paper
22h x 17.50w in • 55.88h x 44.45w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Graphic Art of the Eskimos of Canada, CCP Small Gallery
1976-06
5438
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Informal Session at the CAMP, The Col Nolan Quartet, CAMP
1977-01
5439
2
paper
24h x 9.50w in • 60.96h x 24.13w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Jazz, Picture Exhibition at the CCP End Room
1976-06
5440
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Junyee: Wood Things, CCP Small Gallery
1981-06
5441
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Lee Aguinaldo: Mixed Media Works, CCP Small Gallery
1979-10
5442
2
paper
18.90h x 25w in • 48h x 63.50w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
New Works by Eva Toledo, CCP Small Gallery
1975-05
5443
2
paper
21.13h x 15.13w in • 53.66h x 38.42w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
On Color, Works by Benjie Cabangis, Ginny Dandan, Danny Evangelista, Nancy de la Fuente, Cristina G3onzales, Gig de Pio, Nonong del Rosario, Jacinto Sotto, Phyllis Zaballero, CCP Small Gallery
1977-03
5444
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Once Again, But Beginning by Judy Freya Sibayan, CCP Small Gallery
1980-02
5445
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
One-Lane Landslides by Johnny Manahan, CCP Small Gallery
1975-07
5446
2
paper
21.13h x 18.13w in • 53.66h x 46.04w cm
1
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Paintings by the Southeast Asia Art Association of Singapore, CCP Small Gallery
1976-11
5447
2
paper
24h x 14.24w in • 60.96h x 36.17w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Philippine Art Supplement by Butch Perez
5448
2
paper
24h x 16.25w in • 60.96h x 41.28w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Boldy Tapales, Neal Oshima, CCP Small Gallery
1975-08
5449
2
paper
21h x 15w in • 53.34h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Pictures, CCP Main Gallery
1975-12
5450
2
paper
23h x 17w in • 58.42h x 43.18w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Pictures of Romania, CCP Main Gallery
1976-04
5451
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Plantigraphs, Jose Legaspi, CCP Museum Hallway
1980-04
5452
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Posters of France, CCP Museum Hallway
1977-07
5453
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Printed Matter, Inday Lee, Jo Layug, Fernando Modesto, Glenna Aquino, Santi Bose, CCP Small Gallery
1978-01
5454
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Printings, Nap Jamir II, CCP Small Gallery
1976-05
5455
2
paper
20h x 19.75w in • 50.80h x 50.17w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Printmaking Today, Recent Prints from the Philippine Association of Printmakers, CCP Small Gallery
1975-11
5456
2
paper
23h x 17w in • 58.42h x 43.18w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Printmaking: Developments and Diversions, Nap Jamir II, Ileana Lee, Arturo Luz, Nonon Padilla, Imelda Pilapil, Rodolfo Samonte, Romulo Olazo, CCP Small Gallery
1975-09
5457
2
paper
23h x 15w in • 58.42h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Recent Australian Photography, CCP Museum Hallway
1976-05
5458
2
paper
18h x 24w in • 45.72h x 60.96w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Recent Color Photographs, Neal Oshima, CCP Museum Hallway
1981-02
5459
2
paper
18h x 14.50w in • 45.72h x 36.83w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Recent Prints, Ileana Lee, CCP Small Gallery
1980-10
5460
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w c
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Romeo Olazo, CCP Museum Hallway,
1981-10
5461
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Roots, Basics, Beginnings, Ray Albano, CCP Small Gallery
1977-07
5462
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Second Annual for the Visual Arts, CCP Main Gallery
1977-07
5463
2
paper
27.95h x 19.88w in • 71h x 50.50w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Target, Ofelia Gelvezon, CCP Small Gallery
1972-09
5464
2
paper
23h x 15w in • 58.42h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
The Fifties, CCP
1971-01
5465
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
The Making of King Kong and other works, Roberto Chabet, CCP Small Gallery
1980-12
5466
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
The Possibilities of Clay, An Exhibition of Ceramic Works by Anne de Guzman, Jaime de Guzman, CCP Small Gallery
1973-03
5467
2
paper
21h x 15w in • 53.34h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
The Silkscreen Process, An Exhibition of Prints by Romulo Olazo, CCP Small Gallery
1974-03
5468
2
paper
21h x 15w in • 53.34h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Thirteen Artists 1978, Mercy Acosta, Benjie Cabangis, Ginny Dandan, Lani Maestro, Nonong del Rosario, Jacinto Sotto, Phyllis Zaballero, CCP Main Gallery
1978-12
5469
2
paper
27.75h x 20w in • 70.49h x 50.80w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Untitled Painting No. 1 and Other Paintings, Huge Bartolome, Noli Gamboa, Candy Ramos, Evelyn Santos, Judy Freya Sibayan, Ruben Soriano, An Tison, CCP Small Gallery
1974-04
5470
2
paper
21.25h x 15.10w in • 53.98h x 38.35w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
White, CCP Small Gallery
1972-01
5471
2
paper
21h x 15w in • 53.34h x 38.10w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Word Works, CCP Small Gallery
1979-01
5472
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Work No. 5 from San Francisco, California, CCP Main Gallery
1980-08
5473
2
paper
22h x 17w in • 55.88h x 43.18w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Works in Paris: Collages and Prints, Ofelia Gevelzon-Tequi, CCP Museum Hallway
1979-01
5474
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
Ray Albano
Young Egyptian Artists, CCP Museum Hallway
1977-02
5475
2
paper
24h x 18w in • 60.96h x 45.72w cm
0
0.00
PHP
0
Details
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