Soft Fantasy/Hard Reality

Tosh Basco, Geraldine Javier, Eisa Jocson, Yasue Maetake, Citra Sasmita, Wai Kin Sin, Ming Wong
Silverlens, New York

About

    Soft Fantasy / Hard Reality sets out an initial binary: softness and hardness, fantasy and reality. This set of relations can be extended to its cognates: immateriality / materiality, fictive / factual, or even concept / form. The exhibition presents a roster of artists who work across a variety of practices, media, and form: from painting to sculpture, installation, moving image, performance. These artists and their artistic idioms mediate this initial binary, working through the certainty of its polar distinction and proffering instead a more open-ended encounter with, on one hand, what is soft fantasy and hard reality and, on the other, what may be found in between, alongside, or in the wake of unsettling these categories through the performative, the archival, or the mythical. Within this framework, the titular typographic slant–at once cleaving the binary and coalescing the separate categories into a network of differential relations–becomes central in the exhibition’s prospects. Soft Fantasy / Hard Reality leans into this rhetorical slippage which leads us from this binary to these categories’ misrecognition or else troubling. The exhibition itself flags the preciousness and precariousness of this juxtaposition and in its place offers ways in which reality becomes fugitive trace or fantasy constitutes uncompromising matter. We see this in Tosh Basco’s body drawings where the materiality of the body constitutes the abstraction of its gesture or how a gamut of materials both organic and industrial, from animal bones, seashells, fibers, resin, and metals assembles into almost surreal fabrications in Yasue Maetake’s practice. This also resonates in the work of Ming Wong where the fictive worlding of cinema, theater, and song draw out concrete materialities that foreground the intricate interweavings of colonial imagination and its pragmatic politics. These distinctions are rendered contingent, in flux, in this exhibition: hard and soft, fantasy and reality–these categories continuously morph, inchoately shifting into diverse potentialities.

    – Carlos Quijon, Jr.

    Tosh Basco she/her (b. 1988, California, US; lives and works in Zurich, Switzerland) was born in California and rose to prominence in the drag scene in San Francisco in the 2010s. Well known for her movement-based performances under the name boychild, Basco’s photography and drawing accompany the performance practice. Viewed as a whole, Basco’s work attempts to enfold language, becoming, and representation together in spaces where they are presumed to exist as discrete entities.

    She is co-founder of the collaborative entity Moved by the Motion with Wu Tsang, and collaboration remains a vital aspect of her work. Basco’s solo exhibitions include No Sky, Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2023); Grief Series, Karma International, Zürich, Switzerland (2021); Portraits, Still Lifes and Flowers, Carlos/ Ishikawa, London, United Kingdom (2021); Angels, Hand Dances and Prayers, Company Gallery, New York, NY (2021); Hand dances. 1,000 caresses., Carlos/ Ishikawa, London, United Kingdom (2019). Basco’s work has also been presented at the Venice Biennale; the Sydney Biennial; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; MOCA, Los Angeles; and ICA London, among other institutions.

    Geraldine Javier she/her (b. 1970, Makati City, Philippines; lives and works in Batangas, Philippines) is one of the Philippines’ most important and collected contemporary artists. With a Nursing degree from the University of the Philippines that included a top rank in the licensure exams, she took a second university degree in Fine Arts, and pursued an art practice. Since 1995, she has held more than 30 solo exhibitions in the Philippines, Malaysia, South Korea, Singapore, Germany, and China. From 1999 to 2003 she was a member of the Surrounded by Water collective.

    Much of her early work was in collage form but it was with paintings that she established her reputation as an inventive artist. These were characterized by either melancholy or wit: death and childhood were frequent subject matters. By 2008, she was making fabric works with the paintings and combining them in installations; exhibitions were a mixture of paintings, installations, and objects. Paintings would often have collaged elements, notably preserved beetles and butterflies. In 2013, she moved south from Manila to the countryside in the district of Batangas. Her work increasingly dealt with our relationship with nature. Current projects often involve the participation of the women in the community where she lives. In 2019, she exhibited at the Havana Biennial. Around this time, she began exploring two new forms of paintings: palimpsestic and encaustic (with use of blowtorch).

    Eisa Jocson she/her (b. 1986, Manila, Philippines; lives and works in Manila) is a contemporary choreographer, dancer and artist, her practice exposes body politics in the service and entertainment industry as seen through the unique socio-economic lens of the Philippines. She explores how the body moves and what conditions make it move – be it social mobility or movement out of the Philippines through migrant work. In all her choreographed creations ranging from pole to macho dancing, from hostess to Disney princess studies, capital is the driving force of movement pushing the indentured body into spatial geographies.

    Her work has toured extensively in major performing arts festivals, biennials and institutions worldwide, including Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong (2020); National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea, Seoul (2020); Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2019); Taipei Arts Festival (2018, 2019, 2020); Bangkok Biennale, Bangkok, Thailand (2018); Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2018); International Performance Art Festival, Copenhagen, Denmark (2018); Asia-Pacific Triennial of Performing Arts, Melbourne (2017); Theatre der Welt, Germany (2014); and Zurich Theater Spektakel, Switzerland (2012, 2013, 2015, 2017). Jocson is the winner of the 2019 HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award.

    Yasue Maetake she/her is a Tokyo-born artist living and working in New York City. Her work has been exhibited at numerous national and international institutions such as Espacio 1414 at the Berezdivin Collection, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Queens Art Museum, New York; 10th Sonsbeek, Arnhem, Netherlands; and ASU Art Museum, Arizona, amongst others. Solo exhibitions include Fons Welters, Amsterdam, The Chimney, New York, Microscope, New York, and Nina Johnson, Miami, and others.

    Maetake’s work has been featured in Sculpture Magazine and reviewed in Artforum, The New York Times, ArtAsiaPacific, FlashArt, amongst others. Maetake was named one of “20 international women advancing the field of sculpture” by Artsy, is a recipient of the NYFA Fellowship in Sculpture, and she also completed a residency in the studio of El Anatsui in Ghana sponsored by a research grant from the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan. In summer 2024, Maetake’s essay centered on Eva Hesse will be published in Transatlantique Collection, Paris. Yasue Maetake earned her MFA from Columbia University in New York.

    Citra Sasmita she/her (b. 1990, Bali; lives and works in Bali) is a contemporary artist from Bali whose work focuses on unraveling the myths and misconceptions of Balinese art and culture. She is also deeply invested in questioning a woman’s place in the social hierarchy and seeks to upend the normative construct of gender. One of her long term projects, Timur Merah Project; Harbor of Restless Spirits was presented in Garden of Six Seasons, Para Site Hong Kong—a painting on cow’s hide reflects the Kamasan Balinese painterly language that Citra has been developing in her practice. It represents a geography of female figures, fires, and various natural elements, composed whimsically in an unfolding of pansexual energy. While rooted in mythological thinking with specific Hindu and Balinese references, the scenes are equally part of the contemporary process of imagining a secular and empowered mythology for a post-patriarchal future.

    Citra was a Gold Award Winner UOB Painting of The Year 2017. She was included in Biennale Yogyakarta 2019 and her solo show titled Ode To The Sun was held at Yeo Workshop, Gillman Barracks Singapore in 2020. She was also included in Garden Of Six Seasons, a notable exhibition presented by Para Site Hong Kong.

    Sin Wai Kin they/them (b. 1991, Toronto, CA) brings fantasy to life through storytelling in moving image, performance, writing, and print. Drawing on experiences of existing between binary categories, their work realizes alternate worlds to describe lived experiences of desire, identification and consciousness.

    The artist was the recipient of the 24th Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel 2023 for their film series Portraits (2023). Their film, A Dream of Wholeness in Parts (2021) was nominated for the 2022 Turner Prize, and included in the touring exhibition the British Art Show 9, as well as being screened at the British Film Institute’s 65th London Film Festival. Upcoming solo exhibitions include MUDAM, Luxembourg (2024); Accelerator, Stockholm (2024). Recent solo exhibitions include Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York (2024); Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley (2023); Soft Opening, London (2023); Dreaming the End at Fondazione Memmo, Rome (2023); A Dream of Wholeness in Parts at Soft Opening, London (2022); It’s Always You at Blindspot Gallery, Hong Kong (2021); She’s Hopeful (2018) at Soft Opening, London (2020); Narrative Reflections on Looking at Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb (2020) and Indifferent Idols at Taipei Contemporary Art Centre, Taipei (2018).

    Group exhibitions include Greater Toronto Art (GTA24) at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto; a collaborative presentation with Rainbow Chan at Cement Fondu, Paddington (forthcoming, 2024); CUTE at Somerset House, London (2024); After Laughter Comes Tears at Mudam, Luxembourg (2023); MYTH MAKERS — SPECTROSYNTHESIS III, Taikwun, Hong Kong (2022); Drawing Attention at The British Museum, London (2022). Sin’s work is held in the collections of The British Museum Prints & Drawings; White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney; Ferens Art Gallery, Hull; The Ingram Collection of Modern British Art, UK; Buffalo AKG Art Museum, Buffalo; Sunpride Foundation, Hong Kong and M+ Museum, Hong Kong.

    Ming Wong’s he/him (b. 1971, Singapore; lives and works in Berlin) interdisciplinary practice incorporating performance, video and installation unravels ideas of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘other’ with reference to the act of human performativity. In recent years, he has had strong theatrical interests in the intersection of sci-fi and traditional Chinese culture, particularly Cantonese opera. Wong uses this speculative association to tackle issues such as Chinese modernity, the role of popular culture in building national identities. His works often assemble languages and personalities to create their own “World Cinema.”

    Solo shows include Next Year in Marienbad, Passerelle Centre d’art contemporain, Brest, France; Notes Toward A Chinese Science Fiction Opera, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Next Year / L’Année Prochaine, Ullens Center of Contemporary Art, Beijing, China; Bülent Wongsoy: Biji Diva!, carlier | gebauer, Berlin, Germany; Travaux domestiques, Centre d’art Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland; Me in Me, Shiseido Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Ming Wong: Making Chinatown, REDCAT, Los Angeles, US, among many others. Wong participated in Performa 11 in New York (2011) and Life of Imitation, Singapore Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale, Italy (2009).

Soft Fantasy / Hard Reality sets out an initial binary: softness and hardness, fantasy and reality. This set of relations can be extended to its cognates: immateriality / materiality, fictive / factual, or even concept / form. The exhibition presents a roster of artists who work across a variety of practices, media, and form: from painting to sculpture, installation, moving image, performance. These artists and their artistic idioms mediate this initial binary, working through the certainty of its polar distinction and proffering instead a more open-ended encounter with, on one hand, what is soft fantasy and hard reality and, on the other, what may be found in between, alongside, or in the wake of unsettling these categories through the performative, the archival, or the mythical. Within this framework, the titular typographic slant–at once cleaving the binary and coalescing the separate categories into a network of differential relations–becomes central in the exhibition’s prospects. Soft Fantasy / Hard Reality leans into this rhetorical slippage which leads us from this binary to these categories’ misrecognition or else troubling. The exhibition itself flags the preciousness and precariousness of this juxtaposition and in its place offers ways in which reality becomes fugitive trace or fantasy constitutes uncompromising matter. We see this in Tosh Basco’s body drawings where the materiality of the body constitutes the abstraction of its gesture or how a gamut of materials both organic and industrial, from animal bones, seashells, fibers, resin, and metals assembles into almost surreal fabrications in Yasue Maetake’s practice. This also resonates in the work of Ming Wong where the fictive worlding of cinema, theater, and song draw out concrete materialities that foreground the intricate interweavings of colonial imagination and its pragmatic politics. These distinctions are rendered contingent, in flux, in this exhibition: hard and soft, fantasy and reality–these categories continuously morph, inchoately shifting into diverse potentialities.

– Carlos Quijon, Jr.

Tosh Basco she/her (b. 1988, California, US; lives and works in Zurich, Switzerland) was born in California and rose to prominence in the drag scene in San Francisco in the 2010s. Well known for her movement-based performances under the name boychild, Basco’s photography and drawing accompany the performance practice. Viewed as a whole, Basco’s work attempts to enfold language, becoming, and representation together in spaces where they are presumed to exist as discrete entities.

She is co-founder of the collaborative entity Moved by the Motion with Wu Tsang, and collaboration remains a vital aspect of her work. Basco’s solo exhibitions include No Sky, Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2023); Grief Series, Karma International, Zürich, Switzerland (2021); Portraits, Still Lifes and Flowers, Carlos/ Ishikawa, London, United Kingdom (2021); Angels, Hand Dances and Prayers, Company Gallery, New York, NY (2021); Hand dances. 1,000 caresses., Carlos/ Ishikawa, London, United Kingdom (2019). Basco’s work has also been presented at the Venice Biennale; the Sydney Biennial; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; MOCA, Los Angeles; and ICA London, among other institutions.

Geraldine Javier she/her (b. 1970, Makati City, Philippines; lives and works in Batangas, Philippines) is one of the Philippines’ most important and collected contemporary artists. With a Nursing degree from the University of the Philippines that included a top rank in the licensure exams, she took a second university degree in Fine Arts, and pursued an art practice. Since 1995, she has held more than 30 solo exhibitions in the Philippines, Malaysia, South Korea, Singapore, Germany, and China. From 1999 to 2003 she was a member of the Surrounded by Water collective.

Much of her early work was in collage form but it was with paintings that she established her reputation as an inventive artist. These were characterized by either melancholy or wit: death and childhood were frequent subject matters. By 2008, she was making fabric works with the paintings and combining them in installations; exhibitions were a mixture of paintings, installations, and objects. Paintings would often have collaged elements, notably preserved beetles and butterflies. In 2013, she moved south from Manila to the countryside in the district of Batangas. Her work increasingly dealt with our relationship with nature. Current projects often involve the participation of the women in the community where she lives. In 2019, she exhibited at the Havana Biennial. Around this time, she began exploring two new forms of paintings: palimpsestic and encaustic (with use of blowtorch).

Eisa Jocson she/her (b. 1986, Manila, Philippines; lives and works in Manila) is a contemporary choreographer, dancer and artist, her practice exposes body politics in the service and entertainment industry as seen through the unique socio-economic lens of the Philippines. She explores how the body moves and what conditions make it move – be it social mobility or movement out of the Philippines through migrant work. In all her choreographed creations ranging from pole to macho dancing, from hostess to Disney princess studies, capital is the driving force of movement pushing the indentured body into spatial geographies.

Her work has toured extensively in major performing arts festivals, biennials and institutions worldwide, including Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong (2020); National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea, Seoul (2020); Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2019); Taipei Arts Festival (2018, 2019, 2020); Bangkok Biennale, Bangkok, Thailand (2018); Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2018); International Performance Art Festival, Copenhagen, Denmark (2018); Asia-Pacific Triennial of Performing Arts, Melbourne (2017); Theatre der Welt, Germany (2014); and Zurich Theater Spektakel, Switzerland (2012, 2013, 2015, 2017). Jocson is the winner of the 2019 HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award.

Yasue Maetake she/her is a Tokyo-born artist living and working in New York City. Her work has been exhibited at numerous national and international institutions such as Espacio 1414 at the Berezdivin Collection, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Queens Art Museum, New York; 10th Sonsbeek, Arnhem, Netherlands; and ASU Art Museum, Arizona, amongst others. Solo exhibitions include Fons Welters, Amsterdam, The Chimney, New York, Microscope, New York, and Nina Johnson, Miami, and others.

Maetake’s work has been featured in Sculpture Magazine and reviewed in Artforum, The New York Times, ArtAsiaPacific, FlashArt, amongst others. Maetake was named one of “20 international women advancing the field of sculpture” by Artsy, is a recipient of the NYFA Fellowship in Sculpture, and she also completed a residency in the studio of El Anatsui in Ghana sponsored by a research grant from the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan. In summer 2024, Maetake’s essay centered on Eva Hesse will be published in Transatlantique Collection, Paris. Yasue Maetake earned her MFA from Columbia University in New York.

Citra Sasmita she/her (b. 1990, Bali; lives and works in Bali) is a contemporary artist from Bali whose work focuses on unraveling the myths and misconceptions of Balinese art and culture. She is also deeply invested in questioning a woman’s place in the social hierarchy and seeks to upend the normative construct of gender. One of her long term projects, Timur Merah Project; Harbor of Restless Spirits was presented in Garden of Six Seasons, Para Site Hong Kong—a painting on cow’s hide reflects the Kamasan Balinese painterly language that Citra has been developing in her practice. It represents a geography of female figures, fires, and various natural elements, composed whimsically in an unfolding of pansexual energy. While rooted in mythological thinking with specific Hindu and Balinese references, the scenes are equally part of the contemporary process of imagining a secular and empowered mythology for a post-patriarchal future.

Citra was a Gold Award Winner UOB Painting of The Year 2017. She was included in Biennale Yogyakarta 2019 and her solo show titled Ode To The Sun was held at Yeo Workshop, Gillman Barracks Singapore in 2020. She was also included in Garden Of Six Seasons, a notable exhibition presented by Para Site Hong Kong.

Sin Wai Kin they/them (b. 1991, Toronto, CA) brings fantasy to life through storytelling in moving image, performance, writing, and print. Drawing on experiences of existing between binary categories, their work realizes alternate worlds to describe lived experiences of desire, identification and consciousness.

The artist was the recipient of the 24th Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel 2023 for their film series Portraits (2023). Their film, A Dream of Wholeness in Parts (2021) was nominated for the 2022 Turner Prize, and included in the touring exhibition the British Art Show 9, as well as being screened at the British Film Institute’s 65th London Film Festival. Upcoming solo exhibitions include MUDAM, Luxembourg (2024); Accelerator, Stockholm (2024). Recent solo exhibitions include Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York (2024); Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley (2023); Soft Opening, London (2023); Dreaming the End at Fondazione Memmo, Rome (2023); A Dream of Wholeness in Parts at Soft Opening, London (2022); It’s Always You at Blindspot Gallery, Hong Kong (2021); She’s Hopeful (2018) at Soft Opening, London (2020); Narrative Reflections on Looking at Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb (2020) and Indifferent Idols at Taipei Contemporary Art Centre, Taipei (2018).

Group exhibitions include Greater Toronto Art (GTA24) at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto; a collaborative presentation with Rainbow Chan at Cement Fondu, Paddington (forthcoming, 2024); CUTE at Somerset House, London (2024); After Laughter Comes Tears at Mudam, Luxembourg (2023); MYTH MAKERS — SPECTROSYNTHESIS III, Taikwun, Hong Kong (2022); Drawing Attention at The British Museum, London (2022). Sin’s work is held in the collections of The British Museum Prints & Drawings; White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney; Ferens Art Gallery, Hull; The Ingram Collection of Modern British Art, UK; Buffalo AKG Art Museum, Buffalo; Sunpride Foundation, Hong Kong and M+ Museum, Hong Kong.

Ming Wong’s he/him (b. 1971, Singapore; lives and works in Berlin) interdisciplinary practice incorporating performance, video and installation unravels ideas of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘other’ with reference to the act of human performativity. In recent years, he has had strong theatrical interests in the intersection of sci-fi and traditional Chinese culture, particularly Cantonese opera. Wong uses this speculative association to tackle issues such as Chinese modernity, the role of popular culture in building national identities. His works often assemble languages and personalities to create their own “World Cinema.”

Solo shows include Next Year in Marienbad, Passerelle Centre d’art contemporain, Brest, France; Notes Toward A Chinese Science Fiction Opera, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Next Year / L’Année Prochaine, Ullens Center of Contemporary Art, Beijing, China; Bülent Wongsoy: Biji Diva!, carlier | gebauer, Berlin, Germany; Travaux domestiques, Centre d’art Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland; Me in Me, Shiseido Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Ming Wong: Making Chinatown, REDCAT, Los Angeles, US, among many others. Wong participated in Performa 11 in New York (2011) and Life of Imitation, Singapore Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale, Italy (2009).

Artists

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