Flower Moon

Kitty Taniguchi
Silverlens, Manila

About

    Silverlens is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Kitty Taniguchi. The show called Flower Moon continues the artist’s exploration of imagery revolving around personal mythologies set in landscape.

    Figures are rendered in oil, acrylic and ink comprising of tigers, unicorns, crows, lions, fantastical plants, and cityscapes seen from afar like mountain ranges. In the midst of it all, a woman sits in repose and waiting. The images float freely around her removed from their context and now retold allowing for different embodied meanings. Taniguchi’s re-telling of these myths set in new terrain allows stories to return to its geographical roots and pave other ways of expressing self-hood.

    Crows are an enduring totem for Taniguchi appearing in her body of work as a visual artist and poet. They are drawn hovering in the peripheries or observing at a remove. In the world portrayed in her work, crows are not always black nor are they seen as malevolent. Seen under the New Age lens, the birds are considered a good omen symbolizing magic and mysticism. Literature uses the image of the crow as an ode to imagination bridging reality to creation. Here Taniguchi does the same.

    Dumaguete-based Kitty Taniguchi is a widely exhibited visual artist, gallerist and poet both locally and overseas. She also manages her own art space. Her show will be on exhibit at Silverlens Gallery from May 14 to June 11, 2021.

    Words by Joyce Roque.
 


    Cristina “Kitty” Taniguchi (b.1952) completed an MA in English and American Literature at Silliman University in 1985, completing her thesis work titled Gothic Tales in Siquijor: Their Theological Implications. She has been painting since. She has had solo exhibitions at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, Ayala Museum, Pinto Gallery, and at Mariyah Gallery, an artist-run space she founded in 1992. She has had numerous group exhibitions. She lives and works in Dumaguete City.


    Josephine V. Roque is a writer and lecturer based in Manila. She has written profiles and reviews for ArtAsia Pacific, Art Review Asia and Art Plus Magazine and is currently starting on a collection of new work.

Silverlens is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Kitty Taniguchi. The show called Flower Moon continues the artist’s exploration of imagery revolving around personal mythologies set in landscape.

Figures are rendered in oil, acrylic and ink comprising of tigers, unicorns, crows, lions, fantastical plants, and cityscapes seen from afar like mountain ranges. In the midst of it all, a woman sits in repose and waiting. The images float freely around her removed from their context and now retold allowing for different embodied meanings. Taniguchi’s re-telling of these myths set in new terrain allows stories to return to its geographical roots and pave other ways of expressing self-hood.

Crows are an enduring totem for Taniguchi appearing in her body of work as a visual artist and poet. They are drawn hovering in the peripheries or observing at a remove. In the world portrayed in her work, crows are not always black nor are they seen as malevolent. Seen under the New Age lens, the birds are considered a good omen symbolizing magic and mysticism. Literature uses the image of the crow as an ode to imagination bridging reality to creation. Here Taniguchi does the same.

Dumaguete-based Kitty Taniguchi is a widely exhibited visual artist, gallerist and poet both locally and overseas. She also manages her own art space. Her show will be on exhibit at Silverlens Gallery from May 14 to June 11, 2021.

Words by Joyce Roque.
 


Cristina “Kitty” Taniguchi (b.1952) completed an MA in English and American Literature at Silliman University in 1985, completing her thesis work titled Gothic Tales in Siquijor: Their Theological Implications. She has been painting since. She has had solo exhibitions at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, Ayala Museum, Pinto Gallery, and at Mariyah Gallery, an artist-run space she founded in 1992. She has had numerous group exhibitions. She lives and works in Dumaguete City.


Josephine V. Roque is a writer and lecturer based in Manila. She has written profiles and reviews for ArtAsia Pacific, Art Review Asia and Art Plus Magazine and is currently starting on a collection of new work.

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